Skip to main content

About your Search

20130121
20130129
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
inability as a civil society, a nation that takes such great pride in the rule of law, to in some way come to grips with the mace of of guns and violence -- with the place of guns and violence. and before we begin this discussion, i'll just tell you one very personal anecdote. three days before the sandy hook shooting, i was in denver, colorado, on personal business. and i was driving through the denver suburbs, and i passed into aurora rah, colorado, and saw the sign and thought to myself -- as journalists often do -- oh, my god, this just disappeared from our landscape. it happened not that long ago in which a young man, now appears to be utterly deranged, b went into a movie theater and began shooting down people with an assault weapon. and it went away. the not part of the presidential debate, it was not part of the fabric of our lives, it was not part of the daily journalistic diet. so on that wednesday night i e-mailed the producer of the "meet the press" show that was coming up on that sunday in which they would be talking about big ideas that america needs to be thinking about. and
of dangerous individuals has always been the law. forcing those law more effectively must become a national priority and we must also consider additional qualities -- policies. so we should start by making sure that all records of dangerous individual are headed into the national criminal background check system including mental health records, restraining orders, and other prohibiting records. it also seems to make good sense to close the gun show loophole and extend the background requirements to individual transfer of firearms with reasonable common sense but such a program must be offered for easy online application process and can be used as a foundation for gun registration program of any type. it should simply incorporate additional firearm sales into the same background check program that exist for sales from commercial dealers. exemption should be offered for family to family transaction, any instance my father had begun to me for inheritance, as was for temporary support for self-defense purposes but individuals who reside in rural areas that make the check in practical an individ
we ask of each citizen is to respect the law, and i think that you and the rest must take care and must beware of that. another issue, it's about syria -- >> no, let's talk about the women's issue, because it's an important one. this is not, first of all, nobody in the west is trying to get women to take their veils off. the issue as described in the arab development report written by an arab woman is that there are three great deficits in the arab world x the third one -- and the third one is the rights of women. this is written by an arab about the arab world with enormous amounts of data. by any comparison with the rest of the world, the status of women in the arab world is poor. so, you know, i think part of solving the problem and dealing with it is to acknowledge that it exists. my own humble suggestion would be that you can make this into an anti-western crusade, but the truth of the matter is the women in the arab world deserve better. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: but i have not, i have not blamed the west. i have not blamed the west, and i don'
. and later, live coverage of a forum examining a law passed in 2005 that sets minimum standards for driver's licenses and state-issued id documents. >> now, a group of journalists discuss the 2012 elections and the future of the republican party. they comment on why mitt romney lost the presidential election and the strategies republicans should utilize to appeal to a wider range of voters. among the participants are weekly standard editor bill kristol and msnbc host and former congressman joe scarborough. this forum was part of a conference hosted by the national review institute that examined the future of conservativism. it runs about 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> hi, everyone. wow, wow. incredibly loud, louder than i thought. apologize. i apologize to your eardrums. i'm with national review, and this is our panel on what's wrong with the right. it's going to take the next 72 hours, so i hope you all have provisions for the next couple of days. i'm here with john pod hotter and bill kristol, founder and editor of "the weekly standard," and we're going to get right into it. jo
, republicans voted on the budget control act. they hope this passÉ. it was a law. as senator murray announced today, this year the senate will return to regular order in the budget resolution to the senate floor. the house republicans had to add a gimmick or to today ago that i understand, we all understand the tea party plays a big part in what goes on in the house and they need a gimmick or two to get things done over there. but spare the metaclass another knockdown drag out fight, we are going to proceed to work on this legislation intended out of here as quickly as we can. i went to give credit where credit is due and i think speaker boehner for his leadership in defusing a site over the debt ceiling debate. as i said before, not everything has to be a big fight. this proposal they have in the house is that worth fighting about. so again, i think the speaker for his work in this regard. the metaclass has been telling us they don't want another crisis in this showcase send the security they deserve. senator durbin. >> thank you, mr. leader. america is suffering from confrontation fatigue.
a couple of former governors, harvard law professor, engineer, to name a few. while they have each accomplished so much already, their greatest achievements are still ahead of them. i know they'll look back with satisfaction at the work we do together in the united states senate. our caucus and our country faces immense challenges. as we go through tests and trials, this diverse group in the senate will be united by a single objective, to fight for fairness and balance on behalf of the middle class. we're going to continue to work on old rules -- excuse me, madam president. we'll continue to work with, i will with the republican leader on a package of reforms that i hope we can agree on. as i've said before, if we don't agree, then we're going to do something as a democratic caucus alone. i do remain cautiously optimistic we'll be able to move forward on a bipartisan basis. i hope we can do that. if we do that -- and i'll have more to say about that if in fact we can do that -- we're not going to get everything we want. the republicans aren't going to get everything they want. but
, looking to their government, people who are good citizens, pay their taxes, obey the rules, follow the law and ultimately say we have been left behind. it is enough, mr. president. another 118 days, that's all we have left to memorial day and the beginning of a critically important season for new jersey's economy. a $37 billion tourism industry that cannot get back on its feet unless the federal government says here is how we're going to help businesses reopen. here's how we're going to help people get back into their homes. here's how we're going to help you rebuild the infrastructure that is not only important to the state's economy but to the national economy for which new jersey and of course new york are such big drivers of this national economy, well over 10% to 11%. we only have 118 days, and we have been languishing. now, i personally am tired of listening to the voices of patients and delay and suggesting that somehow we as citizens of the united states are second-class citizens waiting for this government to respond to the needs of fellow americans. that is not what i envision wh
in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address
janet napolitano today called on congress' overhaul the country's immigration laws and create a pathway to citizenship for people in the country illegally. she spoke of the woodrow wilson center about the holistic the department's agenda and the president's second term. secretary napolitano was introduced by jane harman who is the president of the wilson center. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> i'm jane harman, director and president, ceo of the wilson center, and i want to a special welcome the chairman of the board, outboard, my boss, member of, and the members of the world trade council and alliances. it's an honor to cohost this event with the aspen institute, and to welcome ambassadors from bulgaria, canada, costa rica, the czech republic, and arab states, and maybe others. unlike the washington monument or the lincoln memorial, the wilson center is a living memorial to our 20th presiden president. who studied congress, this center was chartered by congress in 1968, and we claim to offer a safe political space for independent research and open dialogue that lisa actionable idea
budgets annually, as the law requires. they have laid out their priorities for the public to see their plans to control spending could save our most important social programs from collapse. to reform an outdated and anticompetitive tax code, and to streamline government bureaucracies that are literally suffering job creation. they have done their jobs while senate democrats have tried to keep their priorities secret. now, we know senate democrats don't like the house budgets, and we know they don't even support the president's budgets, at least not with their votes. what we haven't known for nearly four years is what they're for, because they have refused to put their plans for the country down on paper and actually vote for them. now it's my hope that the democratic sudden interest in passing a budget isn't just another attempt to actually raise taxes. as i've said repeatedly, we're done with the revenue issue. the president has already said that the so-called rich are now paying their -- quote -- "fair share" -- end quote, and of course middle-class families are already on the
requirements. for example, to become a law, a bill must pass both houses of congress identical, then it's subject to the president's veto power, and then, of course, there's always the courts and the supreme court to rule on the constitutionality of legislation. the senate itself is a check on pure majority rule. as james madison said again, the use -- and this is to quote madison -- "the use of the senate is to consist in its proceeding with more coolness, with more system, with more wisdom than the popular branch," meaning the house of representatives. to achieve this person, sphrins the smallest states -- from the smallest states which the same number of representatives from the largest states, which i dmentd on earlier. further, senators are elected every six years, not every two years. these are ample to protect minority rights and to restrain pure majority rule. what is not necessary, what was never intended is an extra constitutional empowerment of the minority through a de facto requirement that a supermajority of senators be needed to even consider a bill or nominee, let alone
of the newspapers today that went into some detail. basically years has started. federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local card services at its embassies abroad and there's that old saying you get what you pay for and this lowest price provision started off in 1990, but it has just stayed with us and i would respectfully request that this committee would take a hard look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody at least look at the highest post where obviously we did it for iraq and afghanistan and pakistan and the countries that you are naming our countries that i think would fall into that category. >> thank you very much bigger to operating in africa today, aqim, al-shabaab to name a few come in your view, which pose the greatest threats to the united states command given the limited capacity in some cases the limited political will of the countries in which these groups operate. the u.s. military intelligence and security assistance resources devoted to these threats adequately are appropriately balanced
about syria, and of course vladimir putin has just enacted one of the most inhumane laws and preventing the americans from adopting the russian children who are deprived of an opportunity of a better life. so, i don't think the status quo in syria is something that we just need to have more conversations about. i think we ought to tell the syrian people we are going to help them or we are not. we know that the supply of arms so they can defend themselves to counter the arms that are being provided by the revolutionary guard on the ground and there's now hundreds of thousands of refugees putting a strain on our allies. i've had a lot of conversations, we have had a lot of hearings that we haven't done anything and we have again, 60,000 dead and after 22 months all i get frankly from the administration as the fall of assad is inevitable. i agreed but what about what happens in the meantime? so, i hope that -- i know that you are deeply concerned about the situation, but it's terrible. it's heartbreaking to meet a group of young women as i did in the camp in turkey, the refugee camp who ha
when we looked in the law and actually read the law, it was illegal because if you tried to move a police station like ten feet to get it out of the way of the river or the land had sunk and you wanted to move it to higher ground, you would actually be penalized 25% because it would fall under an alternative project because it wasn't the exact same. so i said we don't want to build the exact same. that was the problem to begin with. some of our buildings were in places they shouldn't have been. some of our buildings were built with materials we should never have used, so why are we having to rebuild the same old thing? well, because that's what the law says. they said the law needs to be changed, we have changed it. so i hope people while they fuss at government, and i know we have a lot of things to do to get things straight, i want people to know that a lot of thought has gone into some of these reforms based on real-life experiences of what communities have gone through. hopefully the northwest -- the northeast will benefit from this as we go forward. let me just put a few mor
counseling program that goes above and beyond anything that i would put into law. all of the students at elgin community college in elgin, illinois, must submit a monthly budget detailing all their costs when they are seeking financial aid. the student then has a mandatory one-on-one meeting with a counselor to review the loan balance, the repayment options and what happens if you default. this community college has implemented a workshop for students who will be graduating during the upcoming semester to discuss repayment options and give them a complete summary of every loan they have taken out. these students are facing debt the likes of which they have never seen in their lives. they are motivated by all of the preaching they have heard from their parents like me saying go to school, get a degree. they are ready to sign up because they want to do what they think is the right thing. they don't know a for-profit school is worthless. they don't know that thousands and thousands of debt will never be able to be repaid. and they don't know that debt will be with them for a lifetime. so
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15